Windows Vista Ultimate Sp2 (64 Bit)

 Windows Vista Ultimate Sp2 (64 Bit)

Windows Vista Ultimate Sp2 (64 Bit)

3.3 GB
Windows Vista Ultimate Service Pack 2 64 Bit
Windows Vista editions:

Windows Vista ships in eight editions. These are roughly divided into two target markets, consumer and business, with editions varying to cater for specific sub-markets. For consumers, there are four editions, with three available for developed countries. Windows Vista Starter edition is limited to emerging markets. Windows Vista Home Basic is intended for budget users with low needs. Windows Vista Home Premium covers the majority of the consumer market, and contains applications for creating and using multimedia. The home editions cannot join a Windows Server domain. For businesses, there are three editions. Windows Vista Business is specifically designed for small and medium-sized businesses, while Windows Vista Enterprise is only available to customers participating in Microsoft's Software Assurance program. Windows Vista Ultimate contains the complete feature-set of both the Home and Business (combination of both Home Premium and Enterprise) editions, as well as a set of Windows Ultimate Extras, and is aimed at enthusiasts.

All editions except Windows Vista Starter support both 32-bit and 64-bit processor architectures.

Service Pack 1:

Windows Vista Service Pack 1 (SP1) was released on February 4, 2008, alongside Windows Server 2008 to OEM partners, it was a five-month beta test period. The initial deployment of the service pack caused a number of machines to continually reboot, rendering the machines unusable.[66] This caused Microsoft to temporarily suspend automatic deployment of the service pack until the problem was resolved. The synchronized release date of the two operating systems reflected the merging of the workstation and server kernels back into a single code base for the first time since Windows 2000. MSDN subscribers were able to download SP1 on February 15, 2008. SP1 became available to current Windows Vista users on Windows Update and the Download Center on March 18, 2008. Initially, the service pack only supported 5 languages - English, French, Spanish, German and Japanese. Support for the remaining 31 languages was released on April 14, 2008.

A whitepaper published by Microsoft near the end of August 2007 outlined the scope and intent of the service pack, identifying three major areas of improvement: reliability and performance, administration experience, and support for newer hardware and standards.

One area of particular note is performance. Areas of improvement include file copy operations, hibernation, logging off on domain-joined machines, javascr parsing in Internet Explorer, network file share browsing, Windows Explorer ZIP file handling, and Windows Disk Defragmenter. The ability to choose individual drives to defragment is being reintroduced as well.

Service Pack 1 Introduced support for some new hardware and software standards, notably the exFAT file system, 802.11n wireless networking, IPv6 over VPN connections, and the Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol. Booting a system using Extensible Firmware Interface on x64 systems was also introduced; this feature had originally been slated for the initial release of Vista but was delayed due to a lack of compatible hardware at the time.
Two areas have seen changes in SP1 that have come as the result of concerns from software vendors. One of these is desktop search; users will be able to change the default desktop search program to one provided by a third party instead of the Microsoft desktop search program that comes with Windows Vista, and desktop search programs will be able to seamlessly tie in their services into the operating system. These changes come in part due to complaints from Google, whose Google Desktop Search application was hindered by the presence of Vista's built-in desktop search. In June 2007, Google claimed that the changes being introduced for SP1 "are a step in the right direction, but they should be improved further to give consumers greater access to alternate desktop search providers". The other area of note is a set of new security APIs being introduced for the benefit of antivirus software that currently relies on the unsupported practice of patching the kernel (see Kernel Patch Protection).

An update to DirectX 10, named DirectX 10.1, marked mandatory several features which were previously optional in Direct3D 10 hardware. Graphics cards will be required to support DirectX 10.1. SP1 includes a kernel (6001) that matches the version shipped with Windows Server 2008.
The Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) was replaced by the Group Policy Object Editor. An updated downloadable version of the Group Policy Management Console was released soon after the service pack.

SP1 enables support for hotpatching, a reboot-reduction servicing technology designed to maximize uptime. It works by allowing Windows components to be updated (or "patched") while they are still in use by a running process. Hotpatch-enabled update packages are installed via the same methods as traditional update packages, and will not trigger a system reboot.

Service Pack 2:

Service Pack 2 for Windows Vista was released to manufacturing on April 28, 2009, and released to Microsoft Download Center and Windows Update on May 26, 2009. In addition to a number of security and other fixes, a number of new features have been added. However, it did not include Internet Explorer 8:
Windows Search 4.0 (currently available for SP1 systems as a standalone update)
Feature Pack for Wireless adds support for Bluetooth 2.1
Windows Feature Pack for Storage enables the data recording onto Blu-ray media
Windows Connect Now (WCN) to simplify Wi-Fi configuration
Improved support for resuming with active Wi-Fi connections
Enables the exFAT file system to support UTC timestamps, which allows correct file synchronisation across time zones
Support for ICCD/CCID smart cards
Support for VIA 64-bit CPUs
Improves audio and video performance for streaming high-definition content
Improves Windows Media Center (WMC) in content protection for TV
Provides an improved power management policy that is up to 10% more efficient than the original in some configurations
Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 share a single service pack binary, reflecting the fact that their code bases were joined with the release of Server 2008. Service Pack 2 is not a cumulative update meaning that Service Pack 1 must be installed first.


Windows Vista System Requirements (Vista Capable)
Processor: 800 MHz
Memory: 512 MB
Graphics Card: DirectX 9.0 capable
Graphics Memory: 32 MB
HDD Capacity: 20 GB
HDD Free Space: 15 GB
Other Drives: DVD-ROM


Windows Vista System Requirements (Vista Premium Ready)
Processor: 1 GHz
Memory: 1 GB
Graphics Card: DirectX 9.0 capable and WDDM 1.0 driver support
Graphics Memory: 128 MB
HDD Capacity: 40 GB
HDD Free Space: 15 GB
Other Drives: DVD-ROM


Physical Memory (RAM) Limits In 32-bit Windows

Windows Vista Ultimate: 4 GB
Windows Vista Enterprise: 4 GB
Windows Vista Business: 4 GB
Windows Vista Home Premium: 4 GB
Windows Vista Home Basic: 4 GB
Windows Vista Starter: 1 GB


Physical Memory (RAM) Limit in 64-bit Windows

Windows Vista Ultimate: 128 GB
Windows Vista Enterprise: 128 GB
Windows Vista Business: 128 GB
Windows Vista Home Premium: 16 GB
Windows Vista Home Basic: 8 GB
Windows Vista Starter: N/A

Windows Vista Activation Is Included
No Product Key Required!


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